Cozy up to a bowl of Sweet Potato Soup with Andouille Sausage

I don’t know where you are, but winter has Arrived in the upper Midwest and with a chill that already feels like it will never leave me. There’s one food group that is the perfect antidote to Old Man Winter’s efforts to undermine my love of the season: SOUP.

This savory Sweet Potato Soup has a lush and comforting warmth that is further enhanced with the infusion of fall spices like cinnamon and cloves. But, it’s the finishing touch of Andouille sausage that sets this soup apart from other versions. GO STRAIGHT TO THE RECIPE

With its smoky richness, this spicy Cajun specialty adds the wow-factor and makes this soup especially crave-worthy. And, since it is a smoked meat, you don’t even need to worry about cooking it in advance. Just toss it in at the end with a luscious touch of heavy cream and enjoy.

This soup is easy to make – just roast and peel the sweet potatoes, saute up some onions and garlic, add chicken or vegetable stock, the roasted sweet potatoes, cinnamon and cloves and simmer over medium-low heat for 20 minutes.

Next, use a handheld or liquid blender to blitz the soup into a silky puree and finish with the Andouille and cream. Bold in color and flavor, Sweet Potato Soup with Andouille Sausage is the perfect way to stay warm and cozy this winter.

 

 


Halloween Treat #1: Pumpkin Candy Corn Scones

Each day from now through Halloween, I’ll be sharing a recipe for some of our favorite Halloween treats so be sure to subscribe to receive automatic notification of all new posts.

These Pumpkin Candy Corn Scones are a whimsical (and way more delicious) nod to the popular Halloween candy, and the perfect breakfast or after-school treat.

Go to the RECIPE.

To give these scones a seasonal flair,  I adapted my basic scone recipe by adding some canned pumpkin puree and a variety of seasonal spices including cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger and cloves.

For even more seasonal flavor, I used brown sugar instead of white, and also added a tablespoon of pure maple syrup. These scones are not overly sweet, and I add another tablespoon of brown sugar when serving them without the glazes.

The trick to making excellent scones is to use really cold butter, so I freeze the cubed butter for at least 30 minutes, or even longer (it can store for several months in the freezer).

Another key to ensuring a flaky result is to handle the dough as little as possible, so I use a food processor to create the dough, and a cake pan to form the dough before cutting out the wedges. While these steps aren’t necessary, and may even seem a bit fussy, they can make the difference between a good scone and a great scone.

With their autumnal flavor and appearance, these pumpkin scones would also work well for a Thanksgiving brunch.

Go to the RECIPE.

Come back tomorrow for another great Halloween recipe!



Welcome to Good Food & Words

WELCOME!

I’m so glad you’re here for the launch of my new blog, Good Food and Words. Today, November 14, marks the 6th anniversary of my weekly newspaper column for Forum Communications, and also happens to be my birthday. 😊

I love serendipity, and with two special occasions falling on the same day this year, today seemed like the perfect day to go live with our new site. We’re still a work in progress and will be updating the recipe content rapidly in the coming days. Read More